Why we work with co-living

 

We want to create the best place to live. For people and for the planet.

Over the past decades, the growth of our economies has resulted in the massive carbon emissions that are destroying our planet. The narrative is that the improvement of urban lives depend on increasing consumption of resources. There seems to be a mismatch between a high quality life and a sustainable life.

In CPH Village, we want to challenge this and demonstrate that the sustainable life is in fact the best way of living.

As such, relating sustainability to everyday lives necessitate taking a broad view of what sustainability is. In our co-living setting, we are exploring ways of improving sustainability in social, economical and environmental dimensions.

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👋 Social

Basically, our goal is that our villagers are happy and positive about their future.

We provide the setting for them to build a community where one can study, celebrate and rest. Reaching agreements necessitates engagement and establishing practical and social norms. While the social benefits of living together might be obvious, co-living can also include more than good company over dinner. We believe that co-living can be educative, too.

"At CPH Village, we have a diverse group of people with regards to language, education backgrounds, hobbies, habits, age and so on. The mix is essential for villagers' curiosity about each other. They teach each other about cultures, politics and values. I think that is extremely important for a meaningful co-living community".
- Frederik Noltenius Busck, Co-founder of CPH Village

💶 Economical

In CPH Village, our goal is to create a good, sustainable life under 1000 USD a month.

We see that increasing urbanisation has led to expensive housing that pushes lower-income groups out of the cities. Students being one of them.

In our latest journal post, "Affordable student housing", we elaborated on how increasing housing prices has seen students move out of major cities for the first time in years. If we wish to foster mixed cities and provide good conditions for students, affordable housing is essential. However, keeping the prices down is not easy.

Co-living, with small private spaces and prioritizing access to large shared facilities like in CPH Village, has proven to be one way of keeping prices below average. If we are to combat the student housing crisis without compromising quality of life, we believe our way is the way forward.

🌍 Environmental

We need to limit our consumption to the resources of One Planet.
As the housing industry accounts for a large chunk of resource consumption, changing how we build and use homes is paramount.

Sharing what we own is a good starting point. Tools, vacuum cleaners, washing machines, kitchen supplies, unused clothing and food waste can be put to better use. As an example, our villagers regularly host community dinners. Think of the difference 1 community dinner makes versus 164 individual meals. Small improvements can make a big difference if brought to the many!

Sharing to find solutions

How can we improve and make our ideas about co-living relevant for the many? 

This is a monumental question, not just for us, but for society at large. Part of our journey to improve co-living is to share our ideas and insights. This allows us to become better at what we do, and if done well, share ideas with actors who have an impact.

Lots of interested guests at our debate last week. The panel from the left: Almenr Founder and Creative Director Lars Lundbye, City architect Camilla Van Deurs, CPH Village Co-founder Frederik Noltenius Busck, Politiken Byrum Journalist Marie Kraul (who moderated the debate), GXN Head of Innovation Kåre Poulsgaard and EFFEKT Architect Kasper Reimer.

Lots of interested guests at our debate last week. The panel from the left: Almenr Founder and Creative Director Lars Lundbye, City architect Camilla Van Deurs, CPH Village Co-founder Frederik Noltenius Busck, Politiken Byrum Journalist Marie Kraul (who moderated the debate), GXN Head of Innovation Kåre Poulsgaard and EFFEKT Architect Kasper Reimer.

On one of the last days of summer, we hosted a co-living debate in collaboration with BLOXHUB Science Forum. The event took place in our Community Space, the heart of our Village on Refshaleøen. Joined by architects, entrepreneurs, journalists and academics, we discussed what it actually means to "co-live" and what it takes to develop the frames that reap the benefits from it.

In short, the answer is not simple. But through dialogue and open collaboration, we believe we can find great solutions.

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Ida Lundorff